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Edward R. Murrow College of Communication

MURROW MINDS: EMPOWER. DISCOVER. LEAD.

Top 10 research program. Top 2% higher ed research communication programs. Top 20% in student diversity.* And the number one thing that makes the minds at the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication exceptional—passion.

Murrow Minds, established by Paul Bolls, our newly appointed Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies, represents our commitment to action, excellence and industry leadership. It represents the award-winning faculty behind the research that starts global conversations.

OUR RESEARCH PROGRAM

Murrow faculty members study communication using a variety of methods with an emphasis on social science and quantitative research.  Our research efforts span content areas in ways that are unique, even as they overlap and share similarities.  We study the ways humans communicate—interpersonally, as part of groups and organizations, and as a society using digital technology and media.  As digital communication and media influences are far reaching and not bound by geographic boundaries, Murrow faculty members’ research examines issues that span the globe.  

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RESEARCH & LAB FACILITIES

Murrow College houses state-of-the-art technology for studying all facets of communication. Facilities include our Technology-enhanced Focus Group LabMedia Viewing LabCommunication, Emotion and Cognition Lab and a 26-station Digital Research Lab. 

MURROW CENTER FOR MEDIA & HEALTH PROMOTION RESEARCH

The Murrow Center for Media & Health Promotion Research in the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University examines how people use media messages in their decisions about health, and how health promotion practitioners can maximize the effectiveness of health messages targeting young people and their families.  The Center’s work is intended to help individuals and health professionals use media most effectively to facilitate informed and healthy decisions. The Murrow Center faculty members study the following areas: 

  • Media effects and strategies to prevent alcohol and drug abuse 
  • Use of media to reduce sexual assault and promote healthy sexual relationships 
  • Digital media, health and well-being 
  • Parent-child communication about media and health 
  • Media literacy to promote healthy decision making 

Learn more about the Murrow Center for Media & Health Promotion Research

Murrow College Faculty and Students Recognized at AEJMC’s Annual Conference

More than 25 faculty members and Ph.D. students from the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University will present research, participate in panels and accept awards at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication’s all-virtual annual conference Aug. 6-9.

Murrow College received six awards this year and had 19 papers accepted to present, along with three faculty members participating in panels and discussions.

Ph.D. students, Yan Su and Danielle Ka Lai Lee, won the “Chaffee-McLeod Top Student Paper” in the Communication Theory and Methodology Division. Associate Professor Porismita Borah received first place in the Political Communication Division for her collaborative research paper “How the Left, Center, and Right Covered the #MeToo Movement: Structural Topic Modeling, Thematic Structure and Language Patterns.” Borah also received “Top Faculty Research Paper Poster” in the Political Communication Division for her research “How Do People Learn About Public Affairs When Incidentally Exposed to News? Clarifying Political Knowledge Paradoxical Direct and Indirect Effects.”

Jessica Willoughby, an associate professor at Murrow College, placed second for “Top Faculty Paper” in the Communicating Science, Health, Environment and Risk Division for her research on celebrity illness disclosures. Willoughby also took third place for “Open Competition Paper” in the Communication Theory and Methodology Division for her shared research with Ph.D. students Stephanie Gibbons and Shuang Liu about ecological momentary assessments as a tool for media and behavior measurement.

Associate Professor Yoon-Joo Lee took third place for “Special Topics Paper” in the Advertising Division for her research paper “CSR Virtual Reality Campaigns by Alcohol Companies: The Role of Self-Value and Prior Drinking Experiences.”

AEJMC is a nonprofit, educational association of journalism and mass communication educators, students and media professionals. A group of 23 journalism educators and practitioners founded the organization more than a century ago in Chicago, Illinois.

To stay up-to-date with the latest news and information from this year’s conference, search #AEJMC2020 on Facebook or Twitter.

Awards:

Chaffee-McLeod Top Student Paper – Communication Theory and Methodology Division

Su, Y. & Ka Lai Lee, D. (2020, August). Delineating the Transnational Network Agenda Setting of Hong Kong’s Anti-Extradition Movement: A Machine Learning Approach.

First Place Paper – Political Communication Division

Su, M-H., Suk, J., Ghosh, S., Kamath, K., Borah, P., Correa, T., Garlough, C. & Shah, D. (2020, August). How the Left, Center, and Right Covered the #MeToo Movement: Structural Topic Modeling, Thematic Structure and Language Patterns.

Top Faculty Research Paper Poster Award — Political Communication Division

Gil de Zuñiga, H., Borah, P., & Goyanes, M. How Do People Learn About Public Affairs When Incidentally Exposed to News? Clarifying Political Knowledge Paradoxical Direct and Indirect Effects.

Second Place Top Faculty Paper – Communicating Science, Health, Environment and Risk Division

Myrick, J. & Willoughby, J. (2020, August). “I Just Saw on Twitter that Tom Hanks Has Coronavirus”: A Mixed Method Examination of a Theoretical Model of Celebrity Illness Disclosure Effects. (Second Place Top Faculty Paper)

Third Place Paper, Special Topics Paper Award – Advertising Division

Lee, Y-J., Zhao, W. & Chen, H. (2020, August). CSR Virtual Reality Campaigns by Alcohol Companies: The Role of Self-Value and Prior Drinking Experiences.

Third Place Open Competition Paper – Communication Theory and Methodology Division

Willoughby, J., Gibbons, S. & Liu, S. (2020, August). A Two-study Qualitative Exploration of Ecological Momentary Assessment as a Tool for Media, Behavior Measurement.

Panels & Other Discussions:

Rebecca Cooney: Panelist for “We’ve Got This: Best Practices in Online Teaching, and How Teaching Journalism and Mass Communication Prepares Us for the Big Pivot Online” session in the Scholastic Journalism Division on Friday, August 7, at 3:15 p.m. Also a panelist for “Canva in 5 and the Elation of Creation” in the Visual Communication Division on Saturday, August 8, at 3 p.m.

Stacey Hust: Discussing conference papers and research in the Commission on the Status of Women on Friday, August 7 beginning at 8:15 a.m.

Bruce Pinkleton: Co-hosting Member Social with University of Tennessee and Michigan State University deans and directors for Communication Technology Division to represent Washington State University, Edward R. Murrow College of Communication on Friday, August 7 at 6:45 p.m.

Jessica Willoughby: Moderating the Communicating Science, Health, Environment and Risk Division panel on Thursday, August 6 at 5 p.m.

Conference Papers:

Borah, P., Himelboim, I., Trude, B., Binford, M. & Keib, K. (2020, August). “You Are a Disgrace and Traitor to Our Country”: Uncivil Rhetoric Against the “Squad” on Twitter.

Gil de Zuniga, H., Borah, P. & Goyanes, M. (2020, August). How Do People Learn About Public Affairs When Incidentally Exposed to News? Clarifying Political Knowledge Paradoxical Direct and Indirect Effects.

Huber B., Borah, P. & Gil de Zuniga, H. (2020, August). Misinformation Corrective Action when Exposed to Fake News: The Role of Media Locus of Control, Need for Cognition and Fake News Literacy.

Huwang, J. & Borah, P. (2020, August). Extending the Mood Management Theory: How Entertainment and Informational Television Viewing Moderates the Effects of Anxiety on Smoking Behavior.

Su, M-H., Suk, J., Ghosh, S., Kamath, K., Borah, P., Correa, T., Garlough, C. & Shah, D. (2020, August). How the Left, Center, and Right Covered the #MeToo Movement: Structural Topic Modeling, Thematic Structure and Language Patterns. (First Place Paper – Political Communication Division).

Lee, D., Xiao, X., & Borah, P. (2020, August). Self-disclosure on Facebook: “Self” and “Others” from social penetration perspective.

Hu, Y. & Hust, S. (2020, August). Ideological Hierarchy in Current China.

Hust, S., Kang, S., Couto, L. & Li, J. (2020, August). The Association of Fraternity Membership, Sports Media, and Masculinity Norms with College Men’s Acceptance of Rape Myths.

Irom, B. (2020, August). Virtual Reality and Celebrity Humanitarianism.

Kirkpatrick, A. & Hmielowski, J. (2020, August). The Effect of Advanced Technology on Jobs: Attention, Income, Worry, and Support for a Basic Income.

Lee, Y-J., Zhao, W. & Chen, H. (2020, August). CSR Virtual Reality Campaigns by Alcohol Companies: The Role of Self-Value and Prior Drinking Experiences. (Third Place Paper, Special Topics Paper Award)

Park, M., Hsu, Y., Domgaard, S., Zhao, W. & Steinberg, C. (2020, August). Brokerage Combating Misinformation: Examinations of Health Discussion Networks and Attitude toward Child Vaccination.

Su, Y. & Ka Lai Lee, D. (2020, August). Delineating the Transnational Network Agenda Setting of Hong Kong’s Anti-Extradition Movement: A Machine Learning Approach. (Chaffee-McLeod Top Student Paper)

Su, Y. & Xiao, X. (2020, August). Moderated Conditional Effects of Social Media Use, Political Discussion and Trust in Politics on Three Types of Political Participation: Cross-National Evidence.

Vishnevskaya, A., Khan, H. & Tan, Alex. (2020, August). Muslim Women: Semantic and Visual Primes, Stereotypes, and Evaluations. Submitted and accepted as an extended abstract.

Xiao, X. & Wong, R. (2020, August). Which is Better? Theory of Reasoned Action or Theory of Planned Behavior: A Meta-Analysis of Vaccination Research.

Willoughby J., Hust, S., Li, J. & Couto, L. (2020, August). Measurement Invariance of the Sex-Related Marijuana Expectancies Scale Across Age and Gender.

Willoughby, J., Gibbons, S. & Liu, S. (2020, August). A Two-study Qualitative Exploration of Ecological Momentary Assessment as a Tool for Media, Behavior Measurement. (Third Place Open Competition Paper)

Myrick, J. & Willoughby, J. (2020, August). “I Just Saw on Twitter that Tom Hanks Has Coronavirus”: A Mixed Method Examination of a Theoretical Model of Celebrity Illness Disclosure Effects. (Second Place Top Faculty Paper)

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*Ranked as a top ten research program in 21 of 99 research areas by CIOS. Ranked within the top 2% (12/539) of communication programs for higher education research and development expenditures, according to the 2015 NSF HERD Report. The National Research Council Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs (2010) indicates the Murrow doctorate program is #15 of 83 programs in student diversity.